The mountain, Nui Ba Ra, offered a commanding view of the Second Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division AO where 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry worked.

I’d like to introduce you to my friend, Jamie C. Thompson, a Vietnam Vet who served with the 1st Cav during 1970. He recently wrote about his war experience in a book titled: POINT: Wilderness War in Vietnam and Cambodia A Memoir. Jamie has graciously provided this short excerpt of his work.

*****

Chapter 44 – River Crossing; Kit Carson Scout

Just before lunch the next day our azimuth brought us to the west bank of a jungle river. I believe it was the Song Dak Huyt (pronounced “soong doc wheat”) or Dak Huyt River. The river drains the southwestern flank of Vietnam’s Central Highlands and the southeastern slopes of Cambodia’s Sankambeng Range. Much of the year it meanders rather benignly through dense jungle, with many turns and loops, in a generally southwesterly direction, eventually joining the Song Be about thirty kilometers or eighteen miles northwest of Nui Ba Ra. It forms the border between Cambodia and Vietnam for most of its length, but our location was nearly ten klicks inside Vietnam.

The Monsoon Season was beginning. Rainfall where we’d been operating, on the jungle floor, had been intermittent thus far, but when we reached the Dak Huyt we realized that the mountains must have been getting much more rain. What we faced was a raging torrent at least 150 meters wide and of unknown depth. Captain Reynolds decided that we could cross it by forming a human chain, linked arm-in-arm. The idea wasn’t a bad one in concept. In fact, this was how Spencer Tracy as Major Robert Rogers led his men across a river in the 1940 classic movie “Northwest Passage.” However, the river crossed in the movie was about 100 feet wide and, well, it was a movie.

The expressions on our faces when the plan was presented to us are difficult to describe. Generally, they ranged from abject disbelief and horror, through the classic deer-in-the-headlights-of-a-Peterbilt, to narrow-eyed skepticism, with a few fuck-it-it-don’t-mean-nothin’s thrown in. The CO decided that it was best to send the largest men out first, reasoning that their height and weight could anchor the center of the human chain while others pushed past them to the far side and began to pull the rest of us across.

It turned out—not surprisingly to the skeptics among us, including me—that even the biggest men couldn’t stand upright in the current as they neared the center third of the river. I assumed they’d reached what was normally the riverbank, because the depth quickly dropped off there and exceeded their heights. Luckily, the men immediately behind them did not lose their grip and were able to pull the two or three who were swept off their feet to the relative safety of shallower water. Captain Reynolds ordered two more attempts before conceding we couldn’t cross the river on foot.

We moved back into the trees and called for helicopters. It took until the following morning to get it organized, but that day we made what may have been the shortest combat assault of the Vietnam War, a distance of less than two klicks to the nearest suitable LZ across the river. No one complained, though.

On this operation, we had our favorite Kit Carson scout with us. We called him Sam, which was certainly not his name. He was rumored to be fifty-four years old, though no one knew for sure and you couldn’t tell by looking at him whether he was forty-something or seventy-something. He had a wiry build, deeply wrinkled face, and thick fingers. But his feet were his most remarkable physical feature. Sam had never worn shoes of any kind. The bottoms of his feet, including his toes, were calloused to a thickness of about an inch and were as tough and impervious to punctures, cuts, and abrasions as any combat boot. There was something likable about Sam. He could only speak a few essential words of English and he never smiled. But he was always friendly, helpful when asked a specific question, and reliable when sent out alone. Sam could go home to his village whenever he wanted, which he did quite often. In fact, he was only with us about a third of the time. I wondered how strange it would be to live a normal life and fight a war within days or hours of each other, over and over again.

Two days after our river-crossing CA, I had the point and Sam was the second man behind me. Suddenly the normal underbrush thinned and almost disappeared. I knew we were entering a large camp, and it wasn’t one of ours. I held up my hand and passed the word back to the LT and the CO. They decided we should move on through. When we had gone a ways, I turned to Sam and whispered, “VC or NVA?”

“NVA,” he whispered back.

I made a low sweep of my hand to indicate the camp area. “How many?”

He looked at me and whispered earnestly, “Beaucoup, beaucoup.”

This confirmed my thoughts. As we passed through the camp, I picked up a few empty cigarette packs—which appeared to be Chinese—and a C-ration can, passing them back to the LT. Finding such things was not normal. The NVA never left traces like that unburied. It meant they’d left in a hurry and not long before we arrived. We spent twenty minutes investigating the entire camp area. We saw no enemy and made no contact, but determined, based on its size and the number of guard positions, that an NVA force of four to five hundred men had used it within the last two days. Discarded items we found had not been rained on, and it had rained two nights earlier. I guessed that our CA had alerted them and they were ordered to avoid contact, which was fortunate for us.

* * *

Thank you, Jamie, for allowing us to read an excerpt of your book. I’m curious now to find out what happens next in the story and will be looking for “Point…” on Amazon. Here’s the direct link if any of you are interested in acquiring Jamie’s book:  https://www.amazon.com/POINT-WILDERNESS-VIETNAM-CAMBODIA-MEMOIR-ebook/dp/B07Y5Q4JJS

Jamie Thompson was raised in the Chicago suburbs, graduating from Barrington High School in 1962. After attending college off and on at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa, and Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, he was drafted into the U.S. Army in April 1969.  In December of that year he graduated from Infantry Operations and Intelligence NCO School at Fort Benning, Georgia, and arrived in Vietnam in April 1970, as a newly minted sergeant E-5.  In his first month in-country, he became the straight-leg infantry squad leader of 1st Squad, 1st Platoon, Charlie Company, 5th of the 7th, 1st Cavalry Division (Air Mobile), serving in that capacity until he was wounded in Cambodia during the Incursion two months later.  Following a three-month recuperation, he rejoined his squad in the field.  During all but his first few weeks in the field he walked point whenever his squad had the duty.  Upon discharge in 1971, he was awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge, Bronze Star, Purple Heart, Air Medal, and other ribbons and medals from both the U.S. and South Vietnamese governments.

Between 1967 and 1986 he had seven freelance articles published in Chicago suburban newspapers, VFW Magazine and the Chicago Tribune.  In 2019 he wrote Point: Wilderness War in Vietnam and Cambodia to describe his military service from draft notice to discharge, but its focus is the daily existence, as he experienced it in 1970-71, of young American infantrymen in the field during the Vietnam War.  Supported by other military branches and elements, grunts as they were called and as they proudly referred to themselves bore the brunt of the actual fighting on the ground.  But the experience was more than combat; it was a daily struggle with the jungle wilderness, its terrain, its weather, its vegetation, and its warm and cold-blooded critters.  He wants Point to add to the factual record of that extraordinary time before its truth is lost to history.

Note: I just finished reading this book and left a review here on my website:  https://cherrieswriter.com/book-titles-n-r/


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